Hard Look At Soft Fat

Findings show that the structure of cellulite tissue differs considerably in structure and chemical composition from normal fat. This scientific low down on cellulite is useful to fall back on next time somebody tries to tell you those lumps and bumps that you worry about are all in your mind.

Curri examined fragments of adipose (fat) tissue taken from the outer thighs of young subjects, obese adults and older subjects, and then compared their physical and biochemical structures with those from women with cellulite. Examining cellulite tissue under a microscope and analyzing it chemically using gas chromatography, Curri established conclusively both from a morphological point of view (structure) and from a biochemical one that cellulite tissue differs in many ways from normal fat tissue.

structurally or morphologically only in cellulite is there:

  • a leakage of plasma through weakened capillary walls into the spaces between your fat cells
  • a thickening of connective fiber which encapsulates your fat cells
  • the formation of nodules caused by the hardening of collagen
  • a stretching of your capillaries and blood stagnation with poor circulation

Biochemically in cellulite there are significant differences in the ratio of certain fatty acids and triglycerides compared to ordinary fatty tissue. These include:

  • an increase in stearic acid over palmitic acid
  • an increase in stearic acid over oleic-linoleic acid
  • an increase in unsaturated fatty acids over saturated fatty acids

the four stages of cellulite

In simple terms, Curri’s findings showed that the structure of cellulite tissue differs considerably in structure and chemical composition from normal fat.

it also tends to develop in stages:

normal flesh

Skin on your thighs and buttocks is smooth when you are standing or lying down. When pinched it folds and furrows but does not pit or bulge. This is the normal skin of most lean and very healthy men and women.

stage 1

Your skin is still smooth when you are standing or lying, but a pinch test reveals the mattress phenomenon of bulging and pitting. Some deformation of the skin surface has taken place. There are signs of waterlogging – interstitial edema – structural dissociation and the beginnings of tissue dystrophy. Your skin has begun to look pasty. Tissue examination reveals the development of hard fibers in connective tissue.

stage 2

Your skin is smooth when you are lying but when standing it shows signs of pitting and bulging. (This is common in women who are overweight or past the age of 35). Deep palpitation of your skin produces a dull pain. You cannot detect specific nodules to the touch, but micronodules will be seen in tissue examination.

stage 3

The mattress phenomenon is apparent whether you are sitting or lying. Your flesh is painful – sometimes even when not touched – and macronodules or what is known as hypodermic plaque will be seen whether or not there is a lot of edema or water retention present. Histological examination will show that nodules are encapsulated in hardened or sclerotic connective tissue. This stage is very common after menopause, or when a woman is seriously overweight.

So much for the scientific low down on cellulite, all of which is useful to fall back on next time somebody tries to tell you those lumps and bumps that you worry about are all in your mind or to suggest they will disappear in a jiffy on a 900 calorie diet. But the important question for any woman with lumpy flesh is, ‘What am I going to do about it?’ That is where a total shift in body ecology comes in. And I mean total. You can spend as much money as you like, and go through as much agony as you like being stuck and prodded and wrapped in special packages, but unless you go the whole body approach you will be wasting your money.

 

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