Eyes Of A Child

The greatest art any parent needs to develop to support the graceful unfolding of a child’s unique seedpower is the art of listening. Not only can it help you learn from each child what you need to know at any moment in time to help heal, guide and nurture him, it can also help you rediscover the joy of living within yourself – a sense which we as busy, responsible adults so often lose.

Children make the greatest teachers when we are willing to enter their worlds, lay aside our preconceived ideas and learn about how each of them views life. It is only in doing this that a real relationship develops between you and your child, and it is in honest and vital relationships that the power to rear Nature’s child easily and gracefully lies.

Looking at the world through the eyes of a child transforms humdrum reality into a magical land of the unexpected. It can also teach you a lot about how your child thinks and grows emotionally.

`Cigars are fattening,’ my eight-year-old son Jesse announced one day. `I know because all the men who smoke them are fat.’

Children have incredible wit and freshness. Everything is new to them. The most trivial event can bring to a child the kind of pleasure we adults spend a lot of money searching for. But that’s not all. In subtle ways, they are able to teach us truths that we might otherwise never learn.

Once, when we were experiencing gale-force winds, five year old Jesse sat at the window watching what the wind did to the trees. Finally he turned to me and said, `Reflexible trees are stronger than ordinary trees. Do you think reflexible people are stronger than other people?’ I was slow to answer as I couldn’t imagine what he was talking about. `Jesse, what are reflexible trees?’ I asked. `They’re the kind that bend all the way to the ground when the wind blows instead of pushing against it,’ he said. `The reflexible ones don’t get cracked like the others.’ `Yes,’ I replied, `I guess you’re right. Reflexible trees and reflexible people really are stronger than the rest.’

Through thirty four years of motherhood, plus years working with young children in nursery school, I have never stopped learning from them. I know it is supposed to be the other way around – and I have always done my best to explain the intricacies of life to my children and pupils – but in the meantime, they have taught me lessons I won’t soon forget: lessons in courtesy, humor, responsibility. They have shown me how to be angry and how to forgive, how to care for another and still demand my own right to separateness. Most of all, through knowing and watching them, I’ve begun learning how to love – an art that, on too many occasions during these years, I had almost forgotten.

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