zazen

One of the simplest ways of meditating, this technique involves nothing more than just being aware of your breathing. But don’t be deceived by its simplicity. It is a potent tool for stilling the mind and regenerating the body. And concentrating your awareness on the breath is not as easy as it sounds.

You need to find yourself a quiet place where you will not be disturbed. You can sit cross-legged on the floor with a small cushion underneath you, or you can sit in a chair if you prefer, but your back should be straight.

This straight-back position is a requirement for many meditation techniques, since it creates a physical equilibrium which makes calm mental focus possible.

Let your hands rest quietly in your lap.

count your breaths

Close your eyes. Take several long, slow breaths, breathing from your abdomen so it swells out with each in-breath and sinks in again when you breathe out.

Now rock your body from side to side and then around in large, gentle circles from your hips to the top of your head. Rock in increasingly smaller circles until you gradually come to rest in the center.

Now breathe in and out through your nose quietly without doing anything to your breathing – that is, don’t try to breathe deeper or slower or faster, just breathe normally. With each out-breath count silently to yourself. So it goes: in-breath, out-breath `one’…in-breath, out-breath `two’… and so on up to ten, counting only on the out-breath. When you get to ten, go back and begin again at one. If you lose count halfway, it doesn’t matter. Go back and start the count at one again. Counting isn’t the point. It is a way of focusing your mind on your breath.

After fifteen minutes – sneak a look at your wristwatch if you must – stop. Sit still for a moment, then open your eyes and slowly begin to go about your everyday activities again.

If you are like most people, the first few times you do the exercise you will find you lose count often and you are frequently distracted by thoughts or noises. It makes no difference. It works just as well anyway. Each time some random thought distracts you, simply turn your mind gently back again to counting the breaths. Distractions don’t change the effectiveness of the meditation.

The exercise, like most techniques, is best done twice a day, morning and evening. A beginner will usually notice positive results by the end of a week, but they become increasingly apparent the longer you go on doing it. Some Buddhist monks do this exercise for two or three years before beginning any other form of meditation.

beyond relaxation

Once you are familiar with the practice of deep relaxation or meditation and with all the benefits it can bring you, you might be interested to go on to investigate other, more complex forms of meditation. There are many, for meditation is not a word that is easy to define. It takes in such different practices. Some forms such as zazen or vispassana (sometimes called insight meditation) demand complete immobility. You sit watching the rise and fall of your abdomen as you breathe, and whenever your mind wanders you gently turn it back to this observation. This simply concentrated attention, which can be likened to the `continuum of awareness’ in Gestalt theory, is capable of bringing up many repressed feelings and thoughts that have been stifling your full expression and of liberating them. The Siddha Yoga of Muktananda and the chaotic meditation of Rajneesh, where the body is let go to move as it will, are examples of this sort. They often involve spontaneous changes in muscle tension and relaxation and in breathing, and they demand a sense of surrender to the physical body for the release of the mental, emotional and bodily tensions. These kinds of meditation can be particularly good for someone with a tendency to be physically rigid.

Then there are the visualization meditations such as those used in Tibetan Buddhism in which you focus your mind on a particular image, fine-tuning it to the specific beneficial energies or influences this symbol carries (the creative imagery techniques in the next section are also an example of this kind of meditation). They have been used recently to cure serious illness and also in the sports world to improve athletic performance. Another form of meditation is that of “mindfulness,” where you go about your daily activities simply being aware of each thing that you do, as in Gurdjieff’s “self-remembering,” shikantaza or mahamudra. These are just a few of the possibilities worth investigating if you want to go further. Each has something worthwhile to offer, and the mere act of learning a new method and the set of ideas and attitudes that go with it can be an exciting experience as well as tremendously beneficial.

Recommended

1 Comment

  • Rachel Henke September 20, 2012 at 1:41 pm

    Great post. I find meditating so challenging and have tried many different types. What seems to work the best for me is journalling and just being open to connecting with my higher self. I get some amazing insights that way! I’m going to try ‘Holosync’ shortly as I’ve heard great things about that.

    If you’re struggling to meditate don’t worry just test out different ways as we’re all different.

    Thanks for the tips.

    click here to login and leave a comment

Leave a Comment

Want to make a comment? wonderful.
Click Here to Register. It's free and very easy

If you are already a member click here to login